Home » William D King- Don’t Let Company Policies Ruin Your Friendship with a Colleague

William D King- Don’t Let Company Policies Ruin Your Friendship with a Colleague

William D King

When you hire a new employee, it’s important that they assimilate to your organization and follow your rules says William D King. But in order for employees to be happy and productive at work, they need to maintain outside relationships with friends and family — even if these relationships conflict with company policies. The best way to avoid issues is by training managers on how to manage difficult situations without creating resentment or animosity. If an issue does arise, consider mediation between the parties before making any judgment calls about who is (and who isn’t) violating company policy.

Keeping Relationships Confidential Keeps Employees Happy

Building trust between employers and staff creates a positive environment where everyone can do their best work — but this trust has limits when it comes to keeping relationships professional. Keeping relationships between employees and their friends or family members confidential is important because it builds confidence in employers that they can trust their staff to work well together and be honest about personal matters.

Favoritism: A Company Killer

When managers show favoritism towards certain employees, the rest of your team will notice and become resentful (and less productive) as a result. Remember: your Company’s success depends on maintaining a supportive, harmonious work environment — not playing favorites with those who break company policy.

Employee Privacy Matters—Even at Work

You might think you know everything about your colleagues after working closely with them for months (or years). But this information should never make its way outside the office unless you want to make people feel uncomfortable or violate their privacy. When you gossip about other employees, it can damage working relationships that are very important to your business’s success.

When It Comes to Dating, Keep Things Professional

If an employee is seeing someone who isn’t allowed on company property (like an ex), keep the relationship professional at all times and never let outside drama spill into work hours says, William D King. If you want to avoid any drama completely. Consider including a ‘no dating’ clause in your employment contracts of all employees.

Hiring People you’re Friends with Isn’t Always Good Business

It makes sense that if you like someone (and think they’re capable of doing great work). Then hiring them will benefit both parties. However, many companies implement policies that prohibit managers from hiring their friends, so it’s best to avoid the situation entirely. The best way to do this is by keeping personal relationships out of the workplace when possible.

When in Doubt, Follow Policy

Many companies have stand-alone policies that address difficult work relationship issues before they have a chance to impact your business. Enforcing these rules will help you maintain productivity and staff morale. While avoiding any awkward conversations that could potentially damage working relationships. If you need help determining which policies are best for your company. Consult an HR professional who can provide guidance on creating conflict resolution guidelines for employees at all levels.

FAQs:

Q: My co-worker and I are dating, but we don’t want our boss to know. How can we avoid problems?

A: If you’re a manager or a professional at your company. Chances are that you should be maintaining a work relationship with your employees — not dating them. Your company may have policies in place that prohibit managers from being romantically involved with their direct reports. So it’s important for you to consult these policies before entering into a romantic relationship with an employee. If you do decide to date someone who reports directly to you, keep the relationship professional by avoiding office gossip. And never letting personal matters interfere with work responsibilities.  

I was thinking of doing this as more of a template. Where you fill in the blanks with your own situation, but I’m not sure how to do that. If anyone has any thoughts or experience doing it they’d like to share, please leave a comment!

Conclusion:

Family members’ confidentiality is important because it builds confidence in employers. That they can trust their staff to work well together and be honest about personal matters says, William D King. Favoritism: A Company Killer When manager’s show favoritism towards certain employees. The rest of your team will notice and become resentful (and less productive) as a result. Remember: your Company’s success depends on maintaining a supportive, harmonious work environment. Not playing favorites with those who break company policy. Employee Privacy Matters—Even at Work You might think you know everything about your colleagues. After working closely with them for months (or years). However, this information should never make its way outside the office. Unless you want to make people feel uncomfortable or violate their privacy Wen you gossip about other employees.