Home » William D King: Historic Legislation to Curb Human Trafficking Becomes Law Today: President Signs S. 178, the ‘C…

William D King: Historic Legislation to Curb Human Trafficking Becomes Law Today: President Signs S. 178, the ‘C…

William D King

The President signed the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (S. 178) today, marking a historic moment for the fight to eliminate modern-day slavery and restore freedom to thousands of victims worldwide says, William D King.

The President also announced new efforts to find and free human trafficking victims — including children forced into prostitution in America’s own backyards. The President directed the Departments of Justice, Homeland Security, and Labor to implement a zero-tolerance policy for government, business, and law enforcement officials who engage in human trafficking. He also called on Americans to recognize that modern-day slavery exists here at home. And he renewed his call for passage of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2008 (S. 2439), which will help victims build new lives with access to housing, legal aid, education, vocational training…

Introduction:

The President signed the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (S. 178) today, marking a historic moment for the fight to eliminate modern-day slavery and restore freedom to thousands of victims worldwide…

About: …

The President also announced new efforts to find and free human trafficking victims — including children forced into prostitution in America’s own backyards. However, the President directed the Departments of Justice, Homeland Security, and Labor to implement a zero-tolerance policy for government, business, and law enforcement officials who engage in human trafficking explains William D King. He also called on Americans to recognize that modern-day slavery exists here at home. And he renewed his call for passage of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2008 (S. 2439), which will help victims build new lives with access to housing, legal aid, education, vocational training…

Overview/History: …

Sections 202(a) (15) and (16) – Hearsay exception could undermine prosecutions but is necessary for the protection of victims. Section 105 reauthorizes appropriations through FY 2011 for 1) international organizations and programs, including the Special Court for Sierra Leone, the United Nations peacekeeping missions, the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur, investigations by human rights monitors, and related programs; 2) Department of State rewards fund; 3) Department of Labor’s grants to state efforts to prevent trafficking and to protect T visa recipients; 4) Protection Project scholarship and also fellowship program involving enforcement of laws criminalizing trafficking in persons; 5) Task Force on Victims of Crime (including a national hotline); 6) Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program (DNA testing kits); 7) VICTIMS services for crime victims.

For foreign countries that are parties to the Protocol, new funding restrictions are impose. Section 114 – Sex Tourism Prohibition: No person shall be granted a visa to enter the United States if they are coming to the US for the purpose of sex tourism. An exception is made for those who can prove that they were not involved in sex trafficking at any point, or knew it was happening but failed to report. Section 115 – Authorization of Appropriations: Authorizes various levels of funding through FY 2011…

Here are some FAQs recently asked of the US Government:

1. What is Human Trafficking?

Human Trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery involving the illegal trade of people for exploitation or commercial gain. Moreover, William D King says the vast majority of foreign victims are women and children who are force into prostitution, domestic servitude, farm or factory labor, sweatshop manufacturing, janitorial services, hotel services (in-room child sex trafficking), peddling, and begging…

2. How many people are trafficked across national borders each year?

Estimates vary widely but all agree there has been an increase in human trafficking over the past 10 years. Between 600,000-800,000 men, women, and also children are traffick across international borders every year; 80% entered into forced labor situations. A large number also may be traffick internally, and there is growing concern about the trafficking of vulnerable unaccompany alien minors who enter the US illegally from Mexico and Central America…

3. What are common methods used to coerce victims?

Victims often don’t understand that they have been tricking or deceive by perpetrators who gain their trust. Commonly, traffickers use force, coercion, abuse, and also fear to control their victims for exploitation in commercial sex or forced labor conditions…

4. Who are the victims of human trafficking?

Experts estimate that between 14,500 and 17,500 foreign nationals—mainly women and children—are trafficked into the United States each year; more than half of all trafficking victims in this country are believing to be American citizens. Sex trafficking victims fall into two categories: those forced into prostitution and those trafficked for other commercial sexual services, such as exotic dancing or peep shows…

5. How does being a victim of human trafficking affect the victim?

Human trafficking victims may suffer from both physical and mental health problems as a result of their experience; these include substance abuse and sexually transmitted diseases (including HIV/AIDS). Victims may also face additional complications including pregnancy and malnutrition…

Conclusion:

The US Government recognizes that human trafficking is a problem and takes it seriously. We can all do our part to stop this horrible practice by reporting suspicious activity to law enforcement and/or the National Human Trafficking Resource Center